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Home Forums Instruments Electric Guitar Electric is Easier!

10 replies, 4 voices Last updated by  Edith 2 years, 4 months ago
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  • #32774

    Rob G
    Participant
    @Rob_G

    I bet that subject line will get some attention. 🙂

    So, as a 100% Total Noob at guitar, after buying an acoustic, I got to try an electric at my instructor’s house. I found it to be MUCH easier to play. A combination of lighter strings (9’s vs 13’s) and the nature of the electric just made it much easier to get good sound out of it.

    So now I have one of each, but I do switch between the two depending on my mood.

  • #33972

    Stephanie
    Participant
    @stephmcg123

    Hahaha, nice subject Rob! 🙂 I’m totally new, too, and learning on the acoustic makes my fingers HURT! It’s coming along, though, and doesn’t hurt now like it did a few weeks ago, with daily practice. However, I’m with you: I want one of each, and my next purchase will be an electric.

  • #33984

    Rob G
    Participant
    @Rob_G

    Yeah, my fingers were hurting bigtime trying to play my acoustic, especially with the big thick strings on it (13’s). I’ve since put 11’s on my acoustic and it’s MUCH easier to play, and the coated strings don’t hurt as much either.

    I tend to switch between acoustic and electric.. I love the pure sound of the acoustic, but I also love all the neat stuff you can do on the electric.

  • #35671

    Stephanie
    Participant
    @stephmcg123

    I succumbed to the “electric is easier” title and bought one… 🙂
    It’s a second-hand Squier Vintage Modified 70’s strat. Can’t wait to start tearin’ it up!

  • #35964

    Rob G
    Participant
    @Rob_G

    That’s sweet!! The Strat seems to be the most iconic electric guitar and probably the most popular. I’ll probably end up with one eventually. 🙂

    I’m eager to hear what you think of yours and how it compares to your acoustic.

  • #36778

    Stephanie
    Participant
    @stephmcg123

    When I think of electric guitar, the strat is usually what I picture. Honestly, though, I don’t think I’d know the difference in sound without being told: that’s a strat, that’s a Les Paul, etc. Not at this stage, anyway. I bought the strat because it was available and in my price range. 😉
    So far, I notice a huge difference between the acoustic and electric. The strings and action (I think that’s what it is) make the electric easier to play chords, especially barres, which is what I’m working on right now. But, the fret spacing is a little different, it seems, and the neck is narrower, so that’s taking some getting used to. I’m trying to practice pretty evenly between both, so I don’t start to favour one or the other at this stage.

  • #56145

    Richard
    Participant
    @invisipics

    I’m a sort of false beginner because I played a bit of acoustic guitar when I was at university years ago, but I was having a hard time motivating myself to do the courses here with my wife’s classical guitar. I’ve been a member for two and a half years and was still only on week four of the beginner’s course 1, I’m ashamed to say.

    Then in July, my wife bought me an electric guitar (Yamaha Pacifica 611VFM) and I just love it. Played it every day for the last seven weeks and whipped through the two beginner courses, having started from scratch again.

    And the strange thing is I haven’t even tried out the amplifier yet. I just love playing it as it is, without any amplification.

    I think one of the reasons the electric guitar clicked is because the neck is thinner – 4cm across instead of 5cm with a classical guitar. I just find it more comfortable.

    My wife also has a smaller Taylor acoustic guitar and I’ve discovered that this is fun too, but again the neck is 4cm across not 5.

    It makes a lot of noise compared to the electric unplugged!

  • #56181

    Rob G
    Participant
    @Rob_G

    Hmmm…. when you measure the width of the neck across, at what point on the neck are you measuring? I’m curious to measure mine now. At the widest part, where it meets the body of the guitar, it’s 5.7 cm (2.25″).

    Clearly, what works best for you is the slimmer neck. I’ve heard from many people that it’s super important to find a guitar that fits you and you find easy to play. ‘Course my PRS is my first electric so I don’t really know any different. My first guitar was my Yamaha acoustic, and I’m fairly sure its neck was wider, but I sent it to a friend in Chicago since she’s a starving college student and I wasn’t playing it anymore since I got the electric.

    I haven’t tried playing anything else. I’m half afraid to try a Strat or Les Paul because I’m kind of afraid I’ll like them more than my PRS, and those two are already so popular that I like having the lesser-known PRS.

  • #56186

    Richard
    Participant
    @invisipics

    Hi Rob G,

    I was talking about the width of the neck where it joins the tuning board, i.e. the thinnest part of the neck. But it’s also the vicinity where we beginners play all of our chords.

    The guy in the shop who sold me the Yamaha told me that he found an electric guitar more ‘forgiving’ than an acoustic, which I thought was rather an elegant way of putting it!

    Anyway, all the best with your playing.

  • #56228

    Rob G
    Participant
    @Rob_G

    Oh right, duh, I should have thought about that. Up top by the nut makes more sense. And yeah, my instructor used that same term — that it’s more forgiving.

    My PRS is 4.445 cm at the nut (1.75 inches).

  • #92787

    Edith
    Participant
    @Tupper

    I had trouble playing the narrow neck of the first electric guitar I bought, an Epiphone ES339 PRO Cherry. I played around with searches on Google and read a lot on forums and found out that the The Loar guitars had a wider neck, So I went to the musicstore and was lucky to find a second hand one. They paid me good money for my practically new Epihone and so I got the The Loar for a good price. I feel very comfortable with it playing it without an amp but on the amp it buzzed quite a bit. So I bought another The Loar ( any reason to buy another guitar will do, right?) an LH 280 blk because it has two humbuckers so it buzzes less. Afterwards I found out that it was the crappy quality cable I got with the amp that caused the buzz, lol, but I am still very happy with them both. I do have an acoustic but I hardly ever play it anymore since I find it less comfortable. The fretting and strumming is way different and it makes way more noise when practicing. Loudness is ok when you can play really well……not the case yet.
    So I agree with the statement “electric is easier” 🙂

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